Kristi Arpasi, AIFD, CFD
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Journal

Pantone for 2018

Life in Trending Color:  Pantone's Color of the Year

Every December the Pantone Color Institute selects a Color of the Year that not only influences design and fashion industries, but also captures the spirit of the times.  Pantone has once again hit a perfect note with their 2018 Color of the Year:  Ultra Violet--a dramatically provocative and thoughtful purple shade.  Ultra Violet communicates originality, ingenuity, and visionary thinking that points us to the future.  According to Laurie Pressman, vice president of Pantone Color Institute, the ultra violet color represents a true reflection of what's needed in our world today.

Now that Pantone has announced the color of the year, it is certainly worth looking at what colors are expected to trend next year.  Keeping in touch with market trends will help  predict  customer demands, especially for high volume order times like Valentines Day and wedding season.

On the trending colors for 2018, experts agree that millennial pink is here to stay.  This popular light shade of blush most closely resembles rose pink in the flower world, but the definition has broadened to include a wider range of shades.  From lighter neutrals to brighter summer hues, millennial pink is a common choice for retail packaging, makeup palettes, accessories, and home decor.  

This particular shade takes on a more social context as it is a less feminine pink that rebrands the color in a more thoughtful and mature way.  Millennial pink speaks to a generation that strives for equality and questions traditional norms.

Similarly, iridescence is irresistible.  According to Pantone executive director Leatrice Eiseman, the human eye can't avoid anything translucent.  In the same vein, eye-catcing metallics in more neutral tones are expected to remain popular.

Finally, bold colors are expected to take over;  Eiseman predicts a move away from pastels and toward more intense colors which reflect our more intense lifestyles and thought processes.

 

Kristi ArpasiComment